More work needed to raise social care standards

While the Care Quality Commission has tried its best to get a positive spin on the findings in its review of adult social care services  published today, as ever, most people and the media have focused on the negative aspects of it. And they’re right to.

Despite the overall quality of services improving in the past year in all areas, there is still a significant minority of ‘poor’ and ‘adequate’ services being provided to adults and especially older people.

Poor services are always unacceptable and need to be rooted out or given help to improve. Reports like these highlight them, but it means nothing if it doesn’t help to bring about change.

To this end, the CQC’s chief executive, Dame Cynthia Bower, said the CQC is determined to raise standards, hence why 8 councils have been designated as ‘priority for improvement’ councils and another 16 are to have an in-depth inspection of their services.

Elsewhere, the new registration system for adult social care providers, NHS providers and independent healthcare will have a single set of safety and quality standards. Also, the CQC is to get tougher powers and will be able to respond to concerns more quickly.

But local councils also have a role to play in improving services, especially commissioners; they need to look at the services they are purchasing and, if they are failing, move elsewhere. Obvious perhaps, but still needs to be said because it seems some commissioners don’t do this.

Unfortunately, this may be easier said than done. While eligibility criteria for receiving social care remained largely constant in the past year, after the previous 2 years when the number of councils providing care for ‘moderate’ or ‘low’ needs fell markedly, the spectre of eligibility levels being raised again in the coming years because of dwindling budgets looms large.

With budgets being squeezed, commissioners may feel under pressure to look at the cost of services rather than the quality. By the same token, service providers may also be under financial pressure and be looking to make cutbacks, which could affect the quality of their services.

So, in essence, the CQC’s reports are positive – let’s not forget standards are improving – but they show how much work still needs to be done. But by acknowledging this, and laying out strategies to help, the next report should be more positive still. As long as budget considerations don’t impact too much, that is.

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Filed under adult social care, Social care funding

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