Improving dementia services will take time

When the National Dementia Strategy was launched amid much fanfare last February, the government said that dementia would become a priority and services would be improved. But nearly a year on, the rhetoric hasn’t been backed up by enough action, according to the National Audit Office.

In its interim report on improving dementia services in England the NAO was heavily critical of the implementation of the strategy – or lack of it.

Amyas Morse, head of the NAO, said; “At the moment this strategy lacks the mechanisms needed to bring about large scale improvements and without these mechanisms it is unlikely that the intended and much needed transformation of services will be delivered within the strategy’s 5-year timeframe.”

However, some feel that the NAO has jumped the gun with its criticism. For instance, Martin Green, chief executive of the English Community Care Association, called the report “somewhat premature”. He believes that while there is a lot more to be done to improve services, “the development of the strategy and the achievements so far represent a significant improvement in raising the profile of dementia services and giving some clear direction for the future of care and support.”

Green does have a point; it needs to be recognised that it takes time – especially in local authorities and the NHS – for change to happen. For instance, one of the main aims of the strategy is to give basic training in dementia to every health professional that comes into contact with someone with the condition. It takes time to set a project like that up and then complete it.

It is a 5-year strategy and shouldn’t be judged too harshly yet. But nevertheless the NAO’s report should serve as a kick up the behind for government, local authorities and the NHS to ensure that they do implement measures to improve dementia services or at least start putting the mechanisms in place to do so.

This agenda is evidently not going to be forgotten about, and organisations such as the NAO won’t be afraid to criticise if they see things aren’t going as well as they should be. This should ensure that the Dementia Strategy isn’t quietly swept under the carpet by the bodies involved – possibly tempting given the swingeing public sector funding cuts coming – and do, in time, deliver the standards of services required.

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