Paying for care still biggest concern for older people

How to pay for residential care is still the biggest worry for older people, their families and carers, according to a new report.

Older people’s charity Counsel & Care’s Care Concerns 2009 reported that 25% of calls to its advice line are about this.

Nothing new in this – it’s been a worry for years – but it shows that the issue will not go away and that reform is needed.

Indeed, the main concerns of older people are pretty much as they have been for years. Here are the top 5, according to Counsel & Care:

  • Concerns about whether older relatives or friends starting to lose mental capacity are receiving the most appropriate and high quality care available in the setting of their choice
  • Lack of available and meaningful information and advice for older people, their families and carers, particularly those who pay their care costs themselves
  • Difficulty accessing the care and support system
  • Difficulty navigating the complaints process if you experience poor quality care
  • The ever-increasing costs of care and support.

Nevertheless, there are hopes that the government’s white paper on adult social care funding – promised to come out before the election – will address this.

While last summer’s green paper on the future of adult social care funding had some useful suggestions on providing better information for self funders, as well as making the care system easier to access and navigate, it still failed to address one of the most vexed points; people selling their houses to pay for care.

In addition, the government’s free personal care at home bill would go some way to addressing the concerns of older people paying for care, but it only helps those above the threshold for social care funding with high needs and who still live in their own home.

The green paper outlined several options to pay for care costs, from insurance to a mix of state and self funding, but none covered paying for the accommodation costs of residential care, which can still mount up if someone is in care for several years. In that situation, selling their house is still an option.

If nothing else, Counsel and Care’s report is a useful reminder of the main concerns of older people in the care industry and if the government does address these issues, it could leave a long-lasting positive legacy.

Keywords, however, are ‘if’ and ‘could’; if the white paper comes out before the election and if it makes it through parliament. Could, in that nobody knows yet what conclusions the government has come to.

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Filed under adult social care, Social care funding

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