People with learning disabilities still face discrimination

Discrimination against people with learning disabilities is still rife in the UK, with a third of people still believing that they cannot get a job or live independently, according to a new survey.

Health and social care provider Turning Point has found that 9 out of 10 people believe people with learning disabilities are still discriminated against, with 51% saying they are the most discriminated against group in society.

This is not necessarily a revelation – everyone involved in the sector knows that it is rife – but does show how much still needs to be done if people with learning disabilities are to be truly integrated into society.

OK, while it is a survey of only 1,100 adults and nobody knows whether it was weighted to get certain results etc – I know some people are sceptical of statistics – but taking these on face value from a reputable source it nonetheless provides snapshot that can at least create a debate about the topic.

From looking at the survey results, a lot of this discrimination seems to be down to a lack of public understanding about people with learning disabilities and how they live.

For instance, the survey found that 8% still expect people with learning disabilities to be cared for in a secure out-of-town hospital, while 23% believe they live in care homes.

Whether these views are borne of ignorance or prejudice, all this shows that information campaigns about learning disabilities need to be redoubled. Some of the findings show a basic lack of knowledge – such as identifying mental illness as a learning disability – that needs to be addressed.

Adam Penwarden, Turning Point’s Director of Learning Disability Services, hits the nail on the head: “As a sector, we need to work together to challenge preconceptions and show what a positive contribution to society people with a learning disability can make. This includes working, living independently and playing an active role within the local community.”

There have been high-profile anti-stigma campaigns for mental health in the past couple of years and perhaps the time has come for a similar campaign for people with learning disabilities.

Another way to break down stigma would be to have someone with learning disabilities become a regular member of the cast of one of the major soap operas. While this may sound flippant, it can work – the Stacey Slater bipolar storyline in Eastenders (which I blogged about previously here) has helped to bring the condition into the mainstream and increase understanding.

Yes, I know Billy and Honey Mitchell had baby Janet, who has Down’s syndrome, but that character has all been written out now. I am thinking more of an adult/teenage character.

While better information about learning disabilities would not be a panacea – stopping discrimination is an ideal only – it would at least eat into those statistics and provide a good basis for further work.

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2 Comments

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2 responses to “People with learning disabilities still face discrimination

  1. Pingback: Tweets that mention People with learning disabilities still face discrimination « Social care blog -- Topsy.com

  2. You make some very valid points regarding adults with learning disabilities. It is possible that changes to social care funding could make matters worse with less money going to families and people with learning disabilities by up to 50%, if indicative budgets are accurate. Therefore this much marginalised group of people will feel the financial ‘pinch’ to save the government money.

    Good blog, thanks……

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