Tag Archives: adult social care green paper

Scandal of selling homes to pay for care

Over the past few days, one of social care’s great recurring stories reappeared, as it seems to do every few months; the ‘scandal’ of old people having to sell their homes to pay for residential care and/or not being funded by the state for their care.

This time, it was the Daily Mail, which ran with a typically hyperbolic headline of ‘3,000 victims of home snatchers: Record numbers of elderly are forced to sell their homes to pay for care’ .

As usual with these stories, the gist was how scandalous it is that people who have worked hard all their lives to save money and/or buy a house now have to lose/sell it to pay for residential care in their old age, while people who never saved get it for free.

Leaving aside the rights and wrongs of this – there are good arguments on both sides – it again shows that politicians cannot afford to ignore this issue.

Social care has been getting a higher profile in recent months – the green paper on the future of adult social care funding was published in June, for instance – but little action has so far be forthcoming.

While Labour has announced its free personal care at home bill, this doesn’t address the problem of people having to pay for residential care and could even create other issues.

For example, it is likely to encourage older people to stay in their own homes for longer, knowing that if they move into residential care they will have to pay for it and possibly give up their home. As a result, some people may not go into care when they need to, and could suffer as a result, whether in the form of injuring themselves in an accident or fall, or in terms of isolation if they are housebound.

And for those who say ‘well, in Scotland they get it free’; they don’t. There, while the care element might be free, the ‘hotel’ costs of residential care – food, board and lodgings etc – isn’t, so many older people still have to stump up money to pay for their care, including selling their home.

This issue is hugely emotive and could become an issue in the upcoming election. Any party that offers a solution to this ‘problem’ would be onto a sure-fire vote-winner.

The options mooted thus far by Labour and the Conservatives involve insurance schemes, which involve paying a lump sum up front. Labour’s idea is a £20,000 scheme, which would cover the costs of personal care at home and residential care, and while the Tories’ response only costs £8,000, it just covers residential care.

The Liberals meanwhile have sat resolutely on the fence, calling for an all-party commission to come up with a solution, rather than posit any ideas of their own.

None of these options seem to have garnered much public approval so the way forward is unclear.

All it does mean is that the current system creaks on and the reform of it – desperately needed, as organisations within the sector have said time and again – is delayed again.

Perhaps if it does become an election issue, then something might get done. If not, then the Daily Mail, as well as the other national newspapers, will have a guaranteed headline article to publish every few months.

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Filed under adult social care, Social care funding

Big week for social care

For those of us involved in reporting on social care – adults and children – this week is shaping up to be a busy one, with 2 major reports coming out that should make mainstream national headlines.

The much-vaunted final report from Moira Gibb’s Social Work Task Force (SWTF) is due out tomorrow, with the Care Quality Commission’s first major assessment of the quality of adult social care in England coming on Wednesday.

The SWTF report is awaited with particular interest because that should contain elements that – it is hoped – will change social work practice for the better. Some of its contents have already been trailed (including in this blog on November 20) including implementing a probationary year for newly-qualified social workers and the establishment of a national college of social work along the lines of medical Royal Colleges, which augur well for the full contents of the report.

Meanwhile, the CQC’s report has been less well trailed but should also put social care in the spotlight. The report will contain information on all 148 councils’ performance in adult social care, an analysis of how well commissioners are purchasing services, the performance of residential homes and home care agencies, and the CQC’s response to the adult social care green paper.

The media response to both should be interesting because I suspect they will vary significantly. I imagine the SWTF report will be welcomed, with its emphasis on how practice and training can be improved, although there will be gripes about what isn’t included in it.

However, I suspect the emphasis of reporting on the CQC report will focus on the areas that are failing – undoubtedly the minority – and virtually ignore the rest of the content. As usual in the national media, a cheap, sensational, social care-bashing headline and story will be produced, rather than more balanced reportage.

I’ll be covering both reports in the blog over the next few days and try to give a balanced take of the content – whether it is good or bad – as well as looking at the reaction to it elsewhere.

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Filed under adult social care, children's social work, social work training