Tag Archives: adult social care

Big week for social care

For those of us involved in reporting on social care – adults and children – this week is shaping up to be a busy one, with 2 major reports coming out that should make mainstream national headlines.

The much-vaunted final report from Moira Gibb’s Social Work Task Force (SWTF) is due out tomorrow, with the Care Quality Commission’s first major assessment of the quality of adult social care in England coming on Wednesday.

The SWTF report is awaited with particular interest because that should contain elements that – it is hoped – will change social work practice for the better. Some of its contents have already been trailed (including in this blog on November 20) including implementing a probationary year for newly-qualified social workers and the establishment of a national college of social work along the lines of medical Royal Colleges, which augur well for the full contents of the report.

Meanwhile, the CQC’s report has been less well trailed but should also put social care in the spotlight. The report will contain information on all 148 councils’ performance in adult social care, an analysis of how well commissioners are purchasing services, the performance of residential homes and home care agencies, and the CQC’s response to the adult social care green paper.

The media response to both should be interesting because I suspect they will vary significantly. I imagine the SWTF report will be welcomed, with its emphasis on how practice and training can be improved, although there will be gripes about what isn’t included in it.

However, I suspect the emphasis of reporting on the CQC report will focus on the areas that are failing – undoubtedly the minority – and virtually ignore the rest of the content. As usual in the national media, a cheap, sensational, social care-bashing headline and story will be produced, rather than more balanced reportage.

I’ll be covering both reports in the blog over the next few days and try to give a balanced take of the content – whether it is good or bad – as well as looking at the reaction to it elsewhere.

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Big Care Debate – any closer to a solution?

The Big Care Debate closed last Friday (the 13th, ominously, for those of a superstitious bent) ending the consultation on the government’s green paper, Shaping the future of care together , which set out the government’s options for the future funding of adult social care.

Now, the Department of Health will go away and contemplate the results, before, in theory, coming back with a White Paper, possibly in early 2010.

But with an election looming, I wonder if any of it will actually get through and make it into law.  

A spokesperson from the DH told me earlier in the year that if there is no consensus from the Big Care Debate on the best way forward, then it may go to a further period of consultation.

Looking at the reactions to the green paper from various groups, there seems to be little consensus; there have been criticisms, notably from mental health and learning disability groups, that the green paper focused on too much on older people. Indeed, much of the media focus has been on old age care funding and people not having to sell their homes to pay for residential care costs.

But then, older people’s groups, such as the National Pensioners’ Convention, have also voiced dismay over the government’s dismissal of the option to pay for care from direct taxation.

This option also found favour in a Joseph Rowntree Foundation survey. But then other organisations have supported the partnership and comprehensive models of funding the government suggested, which involve insurance and some state provision or the creation of a National Care Service.

If this is reflected among the wider responses, then we could be in for further consultation, which neatly kicks the debate into election time, when nothing concrete will happen because every politician will be scrapping for votes.

So, it seems like the social care industry will be in limbo for some time to come. And all the while the current regime will continue to creak along, and the problems within it will continue to mount, and – crucially – service users will continue to suffer at the hands of a much-disliked and over-complicated funding system.

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