Tag Archives: commission

Social care funding commission has 2 options

This blog was originally going to be about how unhelpful the newspapers’ focus on the Commission on the Funding of Care and Support’s decision to not automatically discount bringing in a “Death Tax” was, but since I started writing, the government has ruled it out completely, according to Community Care.

This isn’t a surprise, to be honest. Firstly, the government would want to defuse criticism from the newspapers that saw this as the Conservatives back-tracking on their stance from the election campaign.

But in any case, since it was christened the “Death Tax”, that idea – a compulsory levy on estates after death – would have been impossible to implement because of the backlash from the press it would get and the image it has in the public’s eye. Whether or not it was the best option is a moot point.

But on the upside this should help bring about a more reasoned debate in the media on what the funding options are – no more tub-thumping headlines screaming about the injustice of the “Death Tax”, for instance.

Many people do not understand the social care or benefits systems currently, so a clear setting out of the current regimes, along with an explanation of all the options being considered and their relative merits/downsides would be good.

Not that there is that much to cover now. Currently, there would seem to be 2 options realistically on the table; a voluntary insurance scheme and a partnership of state finance and service user finance. A system completely funded by users or by the state was ruled out by the last government and has hardly been mentioned by this one, so I think we can assume those ideas aren’t really being considered.

So, it seems as if the commission’s job is to decide which of the 2 options – or slight variations on – is better.

Considering when this last went out to consultation there was no consensus on which option was best, they have a tough job ahead.

So how does the commission decide? Perhaps they should get Harry Hill in – “There’s only one way to find out…”

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Coalition kicks social care reform into long grass

The wait is finally over for social care; now we know what the coalition’s plans are for the sector.

Looking at what the government has published – see here for the full rundown – it is a mixture of reform and continuing existing policy.

Firstly, as expected, Labour’s National Care Service plans have been abandoned. This is clear from the announcement that a new commission on long-term care will be established to report back within a year.

I’ve said before that the last thing the sector needs is yet another commission on the future of long-term care. We had that last year with the Big Care Debate, and others previously. Precisely what differences a new commission will find I don’t know. It just seems like a way of kicking the issue into the long grass and delaying some difficult decisions. Again.

Also, the lack of reference to disabled people in the plans – one mention under the Access to Work proposal – shows the main thinking of any reform is geared to older people.

But interestingly, it says the commission will consider several options; not just the Conservative plan for a voluntary insurance scheme, but also Derek Wanless’ partnership model, where the state and the individual both contribute to care costs.

This is significant because when the results of the Big Care Debate came out, the partnership model was most popular among respondents, and some third sector organisations had also publicly backed such a scheme. It also shows that the Tories may be backing away from their widely-derided option.

Elsewhere, the existing personal budgets and direct payments schemes are to be extended, giving more service users control over their care. This is no surprise – it fits nicely with the coalition’s plans to devolve more power to communities as part of their ‘Big Society’ reforms.

Despite rumblings that some social workers are losing faith with personalisation, the extension of it is generally good news for service users who want to take control over their care, and means no significant upheaval for adult social work departments.

Also, as expected, there will be greater integration of health and social care funding, to focus on preventative action, access to respite care will be improved and Access to Work will be reformed.

So, while there are positives in the announcement, the overriding sense is of disappointment. Firstly that disabled people seem to have been overlooked, and that the much-needed reform of long-term care has again been put back until at least next year. The whole sector has been crying out for reform for years, and another commission – to tell us what we already know – does not help. Why can’t the information in last year’s Big Care Debate be used to put together a coalition white paper on social care reform? Or is that too obvious?

A blog on the plans for families and children will also appear later.

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Filed under adult social care, Social care funding