Tag Archives: consensus

What will be in the white paper?

After what seems like an eternity, the adult social care funding White Paper will finally be published tomorrow. So what will be in it? Here is my bit of crystal ball gazing…

Firstly, it will lay out Labour’s plans for a National Care Service that provides clear national entitlements for everyone, rather than the current postcode lottery. This was first mentioned in last year’s green paper and the idea at least was widely welcomed. The White Paper should flesh out exactly what that might entail and the funding for it.

The free personal care at home policy will also be in there. This has been championed by Gordon Brown and there isn’t a chance it will be dropped now, although the timing of its introduction may be put back until after the election.

In terms of funding, I expect that a ‘partnership’ model – where the state pays a portion of care costs and the service user pays the remainder – will be proposed. In the debate over funding, this seems to have garnered the most support and is something of a ‘middle’ way – and less politically divisive than, say, putting a levy on the estate of every person.

That option is a non-starter because the Conservatives branded it the “Death Tax”. Leaving aside whether it is a good idea or not, the negative publicity already around it would make implementing it political suicide.

Funding will probably be the most controversial part of this; while it is widely accepted that the current adult social care system needs to change, funding it is the tricky bit. For instance, the free personal care at home policy has been consistently lambasted because nobody believes the government’s estimate that it will cost £670 million – some say it could be more than £1 billion.

In addition, setting up a National Care Service, and contributing to everyone’s care costs, will cost billions. In a time where government departments – including the Department of Health – are scrabbling around trying to save billions, you wonder where the money would come from.

And then there is the election. The white paper will probably become a large spoke of the election campaign, which will be a bad thing. As I’ve mentioned previously, cross-party consensus is needed if the best solution for the public is to be reached. With an election, and all the ‘our policies good, your policies bad’ mudslinging that comes with it, this is out of the question.

Of course, the election also means that the White Paper may come to nought if Labour is ousted from power. The Tories have suggested they may go for another consultation before they do anything. If there is a hung parliament, who knows what will happen to it?

So, with that in mind, tomorrow’s White Paper may make promises, but it is by no means certain that essential reform will come to the sector just yet.

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Consensus needed on future of social care

As the debate continues over the announcement in yesterday’s Queen’s Speech of plans for free personal care at home for those in most need, what it does highlight is a lack of political consensus over the future of social care.

Leaving aside the debates on whether the announcement was just electioneering or if the government’s got its sums right with the £670 million per year cost, the hammering it got from the other main political parties’ shows that all have different ideas about the future of social care.

Labour has pinned its hopes on a National Care Service, which yesterday’s announcement is a trailer for and has been covered in the recent green paper.

Meanwhile, the Conservatives have mostly criticised Labour’s plans, while their own proposals have been relatively thin on the ground. The main one has been the idea of the insurance scheme, where people would pay £8,000 and then get free personal care as and when they need it.

As for the Liberal Democrats, they have advocated greater integration of health and social care, and that care be provided on the basis of need rather than ability to pay, but nothing much else recently.

It is widely accepted that social care needs overhauling but surely on something as big as this, and that affects so many people, the parties should be working together on it.

After all, service users and social care professionals surely want to know that policies will be consistent and not changed every time a new government is elected – that can be as harmful as doing nothing.

Finding a way forward is difficult – the debates over the green paper demonstrate this – but this should surely rise above the usual politicking for the good of the millions of service users and carers out there. It should, but I doubt it will.

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