Tag Archives: Conservative

Small print reveals continuing costs of residential care

So, Conservative shadow health secretary Andrew Lansley has pointed out that the government’s plans for funding residential care doesn’t include the ‘hotel’ costs of it.

For those of us that have followed this closely, this is not a revelation. This debate is about paying for care – board and lodging doesn’t come into it. When the green paper on adult social care funding was released last June, some people in social care pointed out that the proposals wouldn’t mark the end of people having to sell their house to pay for care. Interestingly, at the time, this was largely ignored.

Even in Scotland people in residential care have to pay ‘hotel’ costs – something which isn’t pointed out as often as it should be when people in England moan about ‘free’ care north of the border – and older people do still in some cases have to sell their house to pay for it.

But with the government set to shelve plans for the “Death Tax” this week, according to the Guardian, this seems to be the latest attempt to derail plans for reform.

Again, Lansley seems to be at the heart of this. While this smacks of another attempt at cheap political points-scoring ahead of the looming election, it does raise (albeit in a not-too-helpful way) a legitimate point.

One of the aims of any reform of adult social care funding, according to government messages when the green paper came out, is to eliminate people having to sell their homes. The options listed in the paper didn’t seem to do that.

It is still a problem – many voters see the practice as unfair and penalising those who have worked to own their own homes and leave an inheritance – and if it isn’t addressed many will see any white paper as a failure.

However, the green paper was only a consultation, and the white paper – apparently coming this week – may have a solution. We shall wait and see – and expect Labour’s opponents to seize upon it if it doesn’t.

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Consensus needed on future of social care

As the debate continues over the announcement in yesterday’s Queen’s Speech of plans for free personal care at home for those in most need, what it does highlight is a lack of political consensus over the future of social care.

Leaving aside the debates on whether the announcement was just electioneering or if the government’s got its sums right with the £670 million per year cost, the hammering it got from the other main political parties’ shows that all have different ideas about the future of social care.

Labour has pinned its hopes on a National Care Service, which yesterday’s announcement is a trailer for and has been covered in the recent green paper.

Meanwhile, the Conservatives have mostly criticised Labour’s plans, while their own proposals have been relatively thin on the ground. The main one has been the idea of the insurance scheme, where people would pay £8,000 and then get free personal care as and when they need it.

As for the Liberal Democrats, they have advocated greater integration of health and social care, and that care be provided on the basis of need rather than ability to pay, but nothing much else recently.

It is widely accepted that social care needs overhauling but surely on something as big as this, and that affects so many people, the parties should be working together on it.

After all, service users and social care professionals surely want to know that policies will be consistent and not changed every time a new government is elected – that can be as harmful as doing nothing.

Finding a way forward is difficult – the debates over the green paper demonstrate this – but this should surely rise above the usual politicking for the good of the millions of service users and carers out there. It should, but I doubt it will.

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Filed under adult social care, Social care funding