Tag Archives: DLA

DLA changes worry majority of claimants

When the coalition released its emergency Budget in June, the introduction of medical assessments for all Disability Living Allowance (DLA) claimants from 2013-14, with the aim of only paying the benefit for as long as the person needs it, caused much consternation among claimants, their families and disability groups.

Now, the extent of that dismay is becoming clearer. It seems that nearly all people who claim DLA are very or quite concerned about the changes to the benefit being introduced by the coalition government’s Budget, according to a survey by the Essex Coalition for Disabled People (ECDP).

More than half (57%) of respondents fear that their DLA may be taken away under the new assessment rules and 1 in 3 respondents thought it unlikely they would be able to work as a result of the changes.

Nearly 6 in 10 (58%) respondents said the changes were likely to have “a big impact” on their everyday lives, including not getting the support they need (67%) and a negative impact on their family (55%).

For many people receiving it, DLA makes up a significant proportion of their income and is not spent on luxuries, but everyday things that enable them to live their life as they choose, including having a job and, in some cases, paying the bills.

Without it, life would become tough very quickly – they will still need the equipment/services DLA enabled them to buy but have less money to do it with.

Even more so if they were to give up a job because of it, as one respondent quoted in the ECDP report said; “Without my DLA I would lose my adapted car, my independence and my job. DLA supports me to contribute because it enables me to work full time.”

In addition, many service users are also concerned about the closing of the Independent Living Fund to new service users until at least April 2011– something that was not widely flagged when it was announced in May – more than 6 in 10 are very concerned by the changes, particularly around not getting the level of care and support they need (64%) or not being able to live independently (62%).

While this survey was only of 141 people, 93% of which were of working age – and 12% of which had a learning disability and 11% a mental health condition – it nonetheless provides an interesting snapshot of the overwhelmingly negative feelings about the changes.

To bundle DLA and the ILF into the drive to get people off benefits and into work misses the point of them. There is a suspicion among some that the government views DLA as an unemployment benefit, which it isn’t. Also, DLA is not a “scroungers” benefit – the assessment people have to go through in order to receive it is already rigorous.

Some people, such as the example above, rely on DLA to be able to work; to take it from such people and force them back onto benefits seems wrong.

This is something the government should investigate with urgency. Any changes to DLA should not be about cost-cutting, but ensuring disabled people have the means to be able to live their life as they choose and have the same life chances as their able-bodied counterparts. Many people believe the current changes do the opposite and could be disastrous for many people.

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Reflections on the Budget’s impact on social care

As usual, Tuesday’s Budget was a mixed bag; some gains, some losses for the majority of people, including those in social care. Here is a brief summary of what I have spotted.

Firstly, the downsides; public sector pay has been frozen for 2 years, except for those earning less than £21,000 per year. As many people in social care work in the public sector, this could have an impact on service users down the line.

For instance, it could demotivate workers, but some may decide to leave the sector entirely if they see the chance of better pay in the private sector – however, losing experienced staff is something that can be ill-afforded.

Also, the government will introduce a medical assessment for Disability Living Allowance from 2013 for new and existing claimants. Interestingly, the wording in the Budget says that this measure is to “ensure support is targeted on those with the highest medical need”.

I assume this will be some form of capacity for work assessment, which is the prevailing trend in disability benefits. It also seems to indicate that the criteria for eligibility may be raised. This could see some claimants moved onto other benefits that do not pay as much, or off them entirely.

Also, and a little oddly, the document also says that the medical assessment will “ensure payments are only made for as long as a claimant needs them”. As DLA is paid to people with a disability – generally an ongoing thing that doesn’t get better – this makes me wonder if the government really understand what it is and what it is for.

DLA has never been a form of unemployment benefit; it is there to help people with disabilities – physical or mental – pay for items they need to live, such as care services, which the general population do not need. To take this away could make life very difficult for some disabled people.

Elsewhere, VAT will rise to 20% from January 2011, which is a move that will hit everyone in the pocket, but for people on benefits or low incomes, the effect could be magnified.

Also, capping Housing Benefit at £280 a week for a one-bedroom property and £400 a week for a four-bedroom family home could also adversely impact on service users and carers, especially in London and the south of England.

On the plus side, from April 2011, disabled people who require an extra room to support a resident carer will be able to claim Housing Benefit. This again supports the government’s ongoing commitment to the personalisation agenda.

Also, the changes to tax thresholds could see some people on low incomes – which often include carers – taken out of the tax system.

Likewise, the move to link pensions with earnings from April 2011, meaning that it is guaranteed to rise in line with earnings, prices or 2.5%, whichever is the greater, will help older people.  

Chancellor George Osborne added that proposals on welfare reform will be announced by October this year, before the government announces its comprehensive spending review (CSR), which will set out the plans for public expenditure for the next 3 years. It is good to see that – finally – there may be some movement on this much-needed measure.

So there are plusses and minuses to this Budget – possibly more of the latter than the former. However, benefit cuts have not come directly, which had been rumoured, but other measures will impact adversely nonetheless.

But there is also still much that is still to be decided; local authority budgets, which will be announced in the CSR, and that could yet have more impact on social care.

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