Tag Archives: survey

Carers need a life of their own

Isolated, lonely, marginalised; that is how the majority of carers feel, according to a survey published to coincide with this week’s Carers Week.

The survey, which took in the views of more than 3,200 carers across the UK – the majority of which care for more than 50 hours per week – paints a fairly bleak picture of a carer’s life.

For example, 76% said they feel like they have no life of their own outside of their caring role, with a similar percentage saying they have lost touch with family and friends as a result of being a carer. Many feel they have no time to socialise, for romantic relationships or even to have children.

Being a carer also adversely impacts on many financially – 4 out of 5 report being worse off, with more than half having to give up work to devote more time to their role. This also exacerbates many carers’ sense of isolation, with work often a vital means of social interaction.

It makes for depressing reading. What makes it worse is that the survey also reveals what many carers feel they need to make their lives better – and they are relatively modest demands. The 4 main needs are:

  • Access to relevant and practical information, to help them with their caring role
  • The opportunity to take a break when they need it
  • Support at times of crisis
  • Financial support.

To my mind, there is nothing in that list that cannot be achieved, if the political willingness is there.

There is the possibility that some of it may be realised in the relatively short-term. The government has said it is committed to providing a week’s respite for carers, although I believe this is only for carers of severely disabled children (please correct me if I’m wrong) and I haven’t yet seen a timescale for when this might be implemented.

Putting mechanisms in place to provide better information for carers and more support at times of crisis are also achievable at a local level through better working with local authority social services and independent social care providers.

The only demand that may not see any action is that of financial support. Current media speculation about the forthcoming cuts to public spending in next week’s Budgets predicts cuts in benefits so any significant rise to the Carer’s Allowance would seem unlikely. I don’t agree with that, but that’s just the way I think it will go.

These demands really need to be taken into account in the forthcoming independent commission on the future of social care.

Indeed, one of the criticisms of last year’s Big Care Debate and subsequent White Paper – now consigned to the dustbin, of course – was that carers seemed to be largely ignored in it. This always seemed like a huge oversight – not only are carers a vital part of the system, they are often the people who know the most about caring and what service users need.

Hopefully the new commission will take more notice of their opinions and needs and surveys like this will not make such troubling reading in the future.

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Children’s social workers warn of increased risk if services are cut

As warnings go, it is a stark one; cut budgets in children’s social work and put vulnerable children at far greater risk of harm.

This is the headline message from a survey by BASW, conducted over the bank holiday weekend.

A massive 96.6% of respondents said they are concerned at the effects any cuts could have on already understaffed and overworked social workers. As I’ve mentioned in previous blogs (such as Baby P effect sustained) vacancy rates in children’s social work departments are running nationally at about 10% and since Baby P the number of referrals to them has increased markedly. Any more cuts would exacerbate the situation.

This survey is obviously designed to act as a warning to government and local authority purse-string-holders who are currently scrabbling around trying to make billions of pounds worth of cuts – cut children’s social services at your peril. The more subtle subtext is that they would be effectively to blame if another Baby P occurred.

It’s also something of a pre-emptive strike by BASW; the coalition government hasn’t said much about children’s services yet, other than announcing the scrapping of ContactPoint and supporting the recommendations of the Social Work Task Force, and this has worried many in the sector, who fear that children’s service isn’t a priority and therefore a prime target for cuts.

While this was only a small survey – 151 respondents – and so by no means representative of the national picture, it does give an interesting snapshot of the continuing problems in children’s social work.

For instance, only 5% of child protection social workers say their team is fully staffed with permanent social workers, with more than half (52.5%) saying their team is understaffed by 30% or more and 13.1% saying it is by half or even more than that. More than 63% say that their department is understaffed, even with agency staff – who aren’t ideal because they are often short-term and don’t offer the continuity permanent staff do to vulnerable children.

For those in the sector, this will be nothing new. But that’s not really what matters here; it is whether it makes an impression on those who control the money – and I suspect it won’t. A lot of uncomfortable fiscal decisions will be made in the coming weeks and children’s services may well find its budget squeezed, as will many other sectors who also view their funding as crucial.

I’m not saying I agree with this, but this is what I suspect will happen, and there is little that I can see that can be done to stop it.

If budgets are cut, obviously children’s social workers will continue to do their best, but it stands to reason that it would raise the chances of another tragedy along the lines of Baby P happening – you can’t easily do more with less.

If a tragedy were to occur, it would raise some very challenging questions, not only of the profession, but also of government this time.

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